Tuesday, March 23, 2010

Pride and Prejudice

I can't believe I have never done a post of my fav movie. I can't tell you how many times I've seen it, but everytime I watch it I fall in Love all over again. Hope you will too!

Mrs. Bennet: Netherfield Park is let at last. Have you heard who has taken it?
Mr. Bennet: I have.

Elizabeth Bennet: Which of these painted peacocks is our Mr. Bingley?
Charlotte Lucas: He's the one on the left. And on the right is his sister.

Elizabeth Bennet: And the person with the quizzical brow?

Charlotte Lucas: That is his good friend, Mr. Darcy.


Mr. Bingley: I have never seen so many pretty girls in my life!
Mr. Darcy: On the contrary, you were dancing with the only handsome girl in the room.

Mr. Bingley: She is the most beautiful creature I have ever beheld! But her sister Elizabeth is very agreeable...

Mr. Darcy: Perfectly tolerable, I daresay, but not handsome enough to tempt me.


Elizabeth Bennet: I wonder who first discovered the power of poetry in driving away love?
Mr. Darcy: I thought that poetry was the food of love.

Elizabeth Bennet: Of a fine stout love, it may. But if it is only a vague inclination I'm convinced one poor sonnet will kill it stone dead
.
Mr. Darcy: So what do you recommend to encourage affection?
Elizabeth Bennet: Dancing. Even if one's partner is barely tolerable.


Elizabeth Bennet: Mr Darcy? I'd more easily forgive his vanity had he not wounded mine. But no matter. I doubt we shall ever speak again.

Elizabeth Bennet: Are you too proud, Mr. Darcy? And tell me, would you consider pride to be a fault or a virtue?
Mr. Darcy: That I couldn't say.

Elizabeth Bennet: Because we're desperately trying to find a fault in you.

Mr. Darcy: Perhaps it is that I find it difficult to forgive others, or their follies and vices against me. My good opinion once lost is lost forever.

Elizabeth Bennet: Oh dear I cannot tease you about that. What a shame for I dearly love to laugh.


Mr. Darcy: May I have the next dance, Miss Elizabeth? Elizabeth Bennet: You may. Elizabeth Bennet: Did I just agree to dance with Mr. Darcy? Charlotte Lucas: I daresay you will find him to be very amiable. Elizabeth Bennet: That would be most inconvenient since I have sworn to loathe him for all eternity.

Mr Darcy: Why do you ask such a question?
Elizabeth Bennet:
To make out your character, Mr Darcy.
Mr Darcy:
And what have you discovered?
Elizabeth Bennet:
Very little. I hear such different accounts of you as puzzle me exceedingly.
Mr Darcy:
I hope to afford you more clarity in the future.


Mr. Darcy: I, do not have the talent of conversing easily with people I have never met before.
Elizabeth Bennet
: Perhaps you should take your aunt's advice and practice?


Mr. Darcy: Miss Elizabeth. I have struggled in vain and I can bear it no longer. These past few months have been a torment. I came to Rosings with the single object of seeing you. I had to see you. I have fought against my better judgment, my family's expectations, the inferiority of your birth, my rank and circumstance. All these things I am willing to put aside and ask you to end my agony.
Elizabeth Bennet:
I don't understand.
Mr. Darcy:
I love you. Most ardently. Please do me the honour of accepting my hand.


Elizabeth Bennet: Sir, I appreciate the struggle you have been through, and I am very sorry to have caused you pain. Believe me, it was unconsciously done.
Mr. Darcy:
Is this your reply?
Elizabeth Bennet:
Yes, sir.
Mr. Darcy:
Are you... are you laughing at me?
Elizabeth Bennet:
No.
Mr. Darcy:
Are you rejecting me?
Elizabeth:
I'm sure that the feelings which, as you've told me have hindered your regard, will help you in overcoming it.
Mr. Darcy:
Might I ask why, with so little endeavour at civility, I am thus repulsed?
Elizabeth Bennet:
And I might as well enquire why, with so evident a design of insulting me, you chose to tell me that you liked me against your better judgment.
Mr. Darcy
: No, believe me, I didn't mean--
Elizabeth Bennet
: If I was uncivil, then that is some excuse. But I have other reasons, you know I have.
Mr. Darcy
: What reasons?
Elizabeth Bennet
: Do you think anything might tempt me to accept the man who has ruined, perhaps forever, the happiness of a most beloved sister? Do you deny that you separated a young couple who loved each other, exposing your friend to the world for caprice and my sister to derision for disappointed hopes, involving them both in misery of the acutest kind?
Mr. Darcy
: I do not deny it.
Elizabeth Bennet
: How could you do it?
Mr. Darcy
: Because I believed your sister to be indifferent to him.
Elizabeth Bennet
: Indifferent?
Mr. Darcy
: I watched them most carefully and realized his attachment was deeper than hers.
Elizabeth Bennet
: That's because she's shy!
Mr. Darcy
: Bingley, too, is modest and was persuaded she didn't feel strongly for him--
Elizabeth Bennet
: Because you suggested it!
Mr. Darcy
: I did it for his own good!
Elizabeth Bennet
: My sister hardly shows her true feelings to me. I suppose you suspect that his fortune had some bearing?
Mr. Darcy
: No! I wouldn't do your sister the dishonor, though it was suggested...
Elizabeth Bennet
: What was?
Mr. Darcy
: It was made perfectly clear that an advantageous marriage...
Elizabeth Bennet
: Did my sister give that impression?
Mr. Darcy
: No! No. No, there was, however, I have to admit, the matter of your family...
Elizabeth Bennet
: Our want of connection? Mr. Bingley didn't seem to vex himself about that--
Mr. Darcy
: No, it was more than that.
Elizabeth Bennet
: How, sir?
Mr. Darcy
: It was the lack of propriety shown by your mother, your three younger sisters, even on occasion your father. Forgive me. You and your sister I must exclude from this.
Elizabeth Bennet
: And what about Mr. Wickham?
Mr. Darcy
: Mr.. Wickham?
Elizabeth Bennet
: What excuse can you give for your behavior towards him?
Mr. Darcy
: You take an eager interest in that gentleman's concerns.
Elizabeth Bennet
: He told me of his misfortunes.
Mr. Darcy
: Oh, yes, his misfortunes have been very great indeed.
Elizabeth Bennet
: You ruin his chances and yet you treat him with sarcasm.
Mr Darcy:
So this is your opinion of me. Thank you for explaining so fully. Perhaps these offences might have been overlooked had not your pride been hurt by my honesty...
Elizabeth Bennet:
My pride?
Mr. Darcy:
...in admitting scruples about our relationship. Could you expect me to rejoice in the inferiority of your circumstances?


Elizabeth Bennet: And those are the words of a gentleman. From the first moment I met you, your arrogance and conceit, your selfish disdain for the feelings of others made me realize that you were the last man in the world I could ever be prevailed upon to marry. Mr Darcy: Forgive me, madam, for taking up so much of your time.

Elizabeth Bennet: [refusing to visit Pemberley]He's so...he's so rich.
Mr. Gardiner:
Oh, heavens Lizzy! What a snob you are! Objecting to poor Mr. Darcy because of his wealth! The poor man can't help it.


Mr. Darcy: [after he sees Elizabeth at Pemberly, and follows her outside] Miss Elizabeth!
Elizabeth Bennet:
I thought you were in London.
Mr. Darcy: No. No, I'm not.
Elizabeth Bennet:
I'm so sorry to intrude. They said that the house was open for visitors, I had no idea....
Mr. Darcy:
May I see you back to the village?
Elizabeth Bennet:
No! I'm very fond of walking.
Mr. Darcy: Yes! Yes, I know.


Elizabeth Bennet: And what a beautiful pianoforte!
Georgiana Darcy
: My brother gave it to me. He shouldn't have--
Mr. Darcy
: Yes, I should've.
Georgiana Darcy
: Oh, very well, then.
Mr. Darcy: Easily persuaded, is she not?
Elizabeth Bennet
: Your unfortunate brother once had to put up with my playing for a whole evening.
Georgiana Darcy
: But he says you play so well!
Elizabeth Bennet
: Then he has perjured himself most profoundly.
Mr. Darcy: No, I said "played quite well."
Elizabeth Bennet
: Oh, "quite well" is not "very well." I'm satisfied.


Mr. Darcy: You must know, surely you must know, it was all for you. You are to generous to trifle with me. I believe you spoke with my aunt last night and it has taught me to hope as I had scarcly allowed myself before. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My affections and wishes have not changed, but one word from you will silence me forever. If, however, your feelings had changed, I will have to tell you,

you have bewitched me body and soul and I love...I love... I love you. I never wish to be parted from you from this day on.



11 comments:

Rebecca Lau said...

oh my.. i love pride and prejudice

styledummie.blogspot.com
x

Es said...

I love this movie!
You pretty much included all the parts that I watched so much I have them memorized! x]

Miss Madeline said...

adore this movie...as well as the tv version...and of course the actual book! I watched it just the other day actually

pumkyn said...

I didn't give a second thought to watching the movie or reading the book, but now I believe I shall.

Betsey said...

ahh i could watch this over and over and over again. i think i'll put it on right now - thank you & wonderful post :) :)

Andrea said...

wow... lovely post.i love this movie, and as same as Betsey, i could what it over and over again.
is just one of my favourite movies =)

Lizzie said...

Hi...I'm Elizabeth from Mexico.
I follow your blog...is veri cutie. Pride & predjuice is my favorite movie too, and this was a great post...
This is my blog... http://yoypedacos.blogspot.com/
Congrats for yours!!!

Bogdan Epureanu said...

Too many people told me that it's a great movie that I think is about time to watch it too. :)

La'el said...

Ah, I love... I love... I love this movie! Favourite!
Beth

Chantel said...

This is an amazing post! This is my favorite movie as well, I NEVER get tired of it! Thanks so much for sharing! :D

Gabrielle said...

I'm always up to watching Pride and Prejudice. One of my faves :) I love the photos and quotes you posted.